Air Purifying Art: Edmonton International Airports Living Wall

martes, 11 de diciembre de 2012

Air Purifying Art: Edmonton International Airports Living Wall:
Edmonton International Airports Living Wall
Edmonton International Airports Living Wall has been greeting passengers now since May of this year and continues the success of Vancouver based design company Green over Grey in the trend of living vertical installations. The 1420 square feet vertical canvas consists of over 8000 plants and includes several species identified by NASA as being more efficient than mechanical filters at purifying the air of toxins...
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Truman Hosts First Flight Deck Taxiing Of X-47B UCAS-D

Truman Hosts First Flight Deck Taxiing Of X-47B UCAS-D: Aircraft Remotely Controlled On Deck By Arm-Worn Device Sailors aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and personnel from the Navy Unmanned Combat Air System program office (PMA-268) integrated test team made history Dec. 9 as they taxied an X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator aircraft for the first time aboard a carrier.

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Passengers on the future 777X may be surprised to see its wingtips unfolding in a design that lets the Boeing jet's immense wingspan fit at airport gates.



Boeing considers wingtips that fold on its next big jet

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A350: VMU tail strike test will be one of the first to be done next summer

This test allows to determine speeds which are called VMU (Velocity Minimum Unstick). Airbus needs to know the VMU because the computed take off speeds incorporate some margin above VMU, just as they also do for VS (Stall speed), VMCG (Minimum control speed on the ground) and VMCA (Minimum control speed in the air). These "V" speeds therefore form the basic building blocks of take-off performance.

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Chinese group buys American International Group aircraft firm for up to $4.8 billion

American International Group Inc (AIG.N) will sell nearly all of aircraft leasing business ILFC (ILFC.N) to a Chinese consortium for up to $4.8 billion, in a deal that gives the fastest growing aviation market easier and cheaper access to planes.

But the sale is at a far cheaper price than AIG sought and will lead to a substantial loss, the insurer's price for getting out of its last major non-core asset following the U.S. government bailout of the company in the financial crisis.


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