Future Flight: Printed Planes - Plane & Pilot Magazine

jueves, 4 de mayo de 2017

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Marine MV-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft Complete First Pacific Crossing



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Marine MV-22 Osprey Tilt-Rotor Aircraft Complete First Pacific Crossing // The Aviationist
https://theaviationist.com/2017/05/03/marine-mv-22-osprey-tilt-rotor-aircraft-complete-first-pacific-crossing/

Four U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Ospreys Have Crossed the Pacific for the First Time. A flight of four U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft has completed a historic first ever long-range flight across the Pacific Ocean between Hawaii and Royal Australian Air Force Base Darwin. The aircraft stopped on Guam and Wake Island […]
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New process promises greener, more efficient carbon fiber recycling



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New process promises greener, more efficient carbon fiber recycling // Gizmag Emerging Technology Magazine
http://newatlas.com/carbon-fiber-recycling/49354/

While it is already possible to recycle carbon fiber, the material is often simply ground up, or broken down using high temperatures and harsh chemicals – the latter of which are difficult to safely dispose of. Additionally, the carbon strands themselves may be damaged in the process, plus the polymer resin which is used to laminate them together can't be reclaimed. Scientists at Washington State University, however, have developed a process that they say doesn't have any of those drawbacks.

.. Continue Reading New process promises greener, more efficient carbon fiber recycling

Category: Materials

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Embraer sales fall by more than 20% in first quarter - IHS Jane's 360

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Video: 3D-printing moondust bricks with focused solar heat




Bricks have been 3D printed out of simulated moondust using concentrated sunlight. This ESA project took place at the DLR German Aerospace Center facility in Cologne, with a 3D printer table attached to a solar furnace, baking successive 0.1 mm layers of moondust at a temperature of 1000°C. A 20 x 10 x 3 cm brick for building can be completed in around five hours. DLR Cologne’s solar furnace has two working setups: as a baseline, it uses 147 curved mirror facets to focus either actual sunlight into a high temperature beam, employed to melt together the grains of regolith. But this mode is weather dependent, so a solar simulator was subsequently employed as well – based on an array of xenon lamps more typically found in cinema projectors.

Read more: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Engineering_Technology/Printing_bricks_from_moondust_using_the_Sun_s_heat

Credit: ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

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