First A330neo successfully completes maiden flight

jueves, 19 de octubre de 2017

Read more...

Boeing HorizonX Invests in Unmanned Systems Technology Leader Near Earth Autonomy



----
Boeing HorizonX Invests in Unmanned Systems Technology Leader Near Earth Autonomy // MediaRoom
http://boeing.mediaroom.com/2017-10-19-Boeing-HorizonX-Invests-in-Unmanned-Systems-Technology-Leader-Near-Earth-Autonomy

Partnership to explore technologies for defense and commercial applications
----

Read in my feedly.com

Read more...

Emirates sets date to take 100th A380



----
Emirates sets date to take 100th A380 // Airlines news
http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/emirates-sets-date-to-take-100th-a380-442275/

Middle Eastern carrier Emirates will take its Airbus A380 fleet into triple figures next month when it takes delivery of its 100th aircraft.
----

Read in my feedly.com

Read more...

Canada confirms UAV struck commercial aircraft | Safety content from ATWOnline

Read more...

Press Release: How language can play a role in aviation accidents



----
Press Release: How language can play a role in aviation accidents // Runway Girl
https://runwaygirlnetwork.com/2017/10/18/press-release-how-language-can-play-a-role-in-aviation-accidents/

In January 1990, Avianca Flight 52 from Bogota, Colombia, to New York City, ran out of fuel on approach to John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), causing the Boeing 707 aircraft to crash in a wooded residential area in Cove Neck, New York, on the north shore of Long Island. Eight of the nine crew members and 65 of the 149 passengers on board died.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) determined the crash occurred partly from the flight crew's failure to properly declare a fuel emergency. The investigation raised safety issues that included communication concerns between the pilot and air traffic control. Because of poor weather conditions, the aircraft was in a holding pattern and running low on fuel, but the crew did not use the word "emergency," which resulted in air traffic control underestimating the seriousness of the situation and the need for special handling.

In another accident in October 2001, a small Cessna Citation CJ2 business jet collided with a McDonnell Douglas MD-87 airliner on the runway at Linate Airport in Milan, Italy. All 114 people on both aircraft died, as well as four people on the ground. While many factors were noted, accident investigators also found that the aviation terms and phrases widely used by the controllers and pilots did not conform to International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) recommended practices. Communication also alternated between English and Italian.

Those are two examples of aircraft accidents where inadequate English language proficiency was noted by investigators as playing a role in the chain of events leading up to the accident. Elizabeth Mathews, former linguistic consultant for ICAO and assistant professor at Embry-Riddle, believes language has been a factor more often than has been noted. As an expert in language as a factor in aviation safety, Mathews is part of a team at Embry-Riddle's Daytona Beach and Worldwide campuses combing through databases of aircraft accidents globally to determine the role communication deficiencies may have played.

That research is just one part of Embry-Riddle's overall Language as a Human Factor in Aviation Safety (LHUFT) Initiative to heighten awareness, improve aviation safety and enhance future investigations.

The initiative and LHUFT Center involves partnerships with Georgia State University and Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS). The work includes joint research projects; developing curriculum for aviation English; advocating for best practices in aviation language training, teacher training and testing programs, which are currently unregulated; and becoming an industry leader for language in aviation research and expertise.

"While communication is universally acknowledged to be critical to aviation safety, industry understanding of communication and language as fundamental aspects of aviation safety has not kept pace with our understanding of other human performance factors," Mathews said.

Mathews noted that language issues in aviation are not investigated with the same degree of systematic and expert thoroughness with which other human and operational factors are considered.

"Embry-Riddle hopes to provide an organizational focus to support human factors specialists, accident investigators and safety experts to better consider communication and language factors and to build a bridge between the field of human factors in aviation and applied linguistics. The goal is to improve aviation safety by heightening industry awareness of the threats posed by language issues in aviation," Mathews said.

One of the first steps of the initiative was the establishment in August of the first comprehensive bibliography of published resources on language as a human factor in aviation that is housed in Embry-Riddle's Scholarly Commons digital repository. The free bibliography was compiled by Dr. Anne Marie Casey, dean of Embry-Riddle's Scholarly Communication and the Library, and William Condon, research librarian. The bibliography, edited by Jane Deighan, special projects librarian, contains thousands of references to articles, books, reports, dissertations and theses.

Three new courses —  Language as a Factor in Aviation Safety, Aviation Topics and English for VFR Flight — are also being offered at Embry-Riddle's Daytona Beach Campus to increase awareness and improve communication with the goal of expanding to Embry-Riddle's Worldwide campuses. More are also planned. English for VFR (Visual Flight Rules) that began in the Spring at Embry-Riddle's Language Institute has interactive classroom sessions teaching flight students listening and speaking strategies, and English language skills to successfully communicate with air traffic controllers.

Jennifer Roberts, Aviation English Specialist for Embry-Riddle's Worldwide Campus in the College of Aeronautics, who developed and continues to develop new curriculum, said as air travel increases around the world, particularly in places where English is not the primary language, so does the need to ensure a safe and efficient level of English language proficiency for all aviation personnel.

"Too many aviation personnel are receiving operational training without sufficient English language instruction to reach the level of proficiency that will be needed when mechanics, controllers, or pilots, all with different native languages, are expected to communicate about issues in the hangar, the tower or the flight deck," Roberts said. "The list of potential opportunities for miscommunication in aviation is endless."

As a former FAA air traffic controller, Dr. Sid McGuirk, department chair of Applied Aviation Sciences for Embry-Riddle's Daytona Beach Campus, said he knows first-hand the importance of communication to flight safety.

"Language is key not only for pilots and air traffic controllers, but throughout many facets of aviation," McGuirk said. "Nearly all human factors textbooks and manuals identify communication as a critical element of safe operations, citing both first-language and second-language interactions as contributory factors to numerous accidents and incidents. Embry-Riddle is proud to be supporting this initiative to foster improved understanding of language use in aviation."

Graduate student Steven Singleton, who is specializing in aviation safety management systems, is part of the team that is reviewing aviation accidents that have occurred during the last 30 years. He is looking for potential evidence of language issues that could have contributed to those accidents.

"Language issues are mostly ignored or not considered in many accidents and those findings could have been used as tools in future risk reduction," said Singleton, who received a bachelor's degree in Aerospace and Occupational Safety from Embry-Riddle this past spring. "If I can help find these potential factors in aircraft accidents, it can help Professor Mathews educate the aviation industry on ways to make it safer."

ABOUT EMBRY-RIDDLE AERONAUTICAL UNIVERSITY

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, the world's largest, fully accredited university specializing in aviation and aerospace, is a nonprofit, independent institution offering more than 80 baccalaureate, master's and Ph.D. degree programs in its colleges of Arts & Sciences, Aviation, Business, Engineering and Security & Intelligence. Embry-Riddle educates students at residential campuses in Daytona Beach, Fla., and Prescott, Ariz., through the Worldwide Campus with more than 125 locations in the United States, Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and through online programs. The university is a major research center, seeking solutions to real-world problems in partnership with the aerospace industry, other universities and government agencies. For more information, visit www.embryriddle.edu, follow us on Twitter (@EmbryRiddle) and facebook.com/EmbryRiddleUniversity, and find expert videos at YouTube.com/EmbryRiddleUniv.

The post Press Release: How language can play a role in aviation accidents appeared first on Runway Girl.


----

Read in my feedly.com

Read more...

El Conde Duque abre una exposición sobre la Historia de la Aviación y los 90 años de Iberia.



El sueño de volar, en el Centro Cultural Conde Duque



· Hoy se ha inaugurado una exposición de la historia de la Aviación Española y de los 90 años de Iberia, que permanecerá abierta hasta el 3 de diciembre.



· Organizada por la Agencia Efe y la aerolínea española, recorre mediante fotos, objetos, documentos y vídeos, los momentos más significativos del desarrollo de la aviación en nuestro país.



· Ha sido inaugurada por el ministro de Fomento, la concejala de movilidad del Ayuntamiento de Madrid y los presidentes de AENA, IAG, Efe e Iberia, entre otras autoridades relacionadas con la aviación.



· Iberia también celebra su 90 aniversario con una promoción inédita hasta ahora y que acaba de lanzar en su web: “90 horas a precios locos”.







Madrid, 19 de octubre 2017





El Centro Cultural Conde Duque es testigo de una completa exposición sobre la historia de la aviación en nuestro país.



La Agencia Efe e Iberia se han unido, con motivo del 90 aniversario de la aerolínea, para mostrar a los madrileños y visitantes un recorrido por la historia de la aviación, desde los que soñaron con la posibilidad de surcar los cielos, los que lo lograron por primera vez, y los 90 años de la historia de Iberia, protagonista del origen y desarrollo de la aviación en nuestro país.



La exposición se ha inaugurado hoy con la presencia del Ministro de Fomento, Íñigo de la Serna; de Inés Sabanés, concejala del Ayuntamiento de Madrid; Jaime García-Legaz Presidente de AENA; Antonio Vázquez, presidente de IAG; José Antonio Vera, presidente de Efe y Luis Gallego, presidente de Iberia, entre otras personalidades relacionadas con el mundo de la aviación.





En la exposición se han incluido objetos que permiten entender la evolución de este sector. Entre ellos la maqueta del avión de los hermanos Wright y la del último de los aviones de Iberia, el A330. También una maqueta del hangar 6 de Iberia, el mayor de Europa sin soportes intermedios; la rueda de un Jumbo, álabes de motor, una hélice, una caja negra abierta o los uniformes que a lo largo de la historia han vestido las tripulantes de Iberia, entre otros.



Mucho más que aviones



Pero volar es mucho más que aviones. Por eso, en la exposición se muestran todo tipo de objetos que forman parte del mundo apasionante de la aviación: billetes de avión, cartas menús de ayer y hoy, tarjetas de embarque, horarios, objetos promocionales y de entretenimiento a bordo de todo tipo, magníficos carteles o vajillas. Y fotos. Fotos de muchos momentos para recordar, y que hoy forman parte de la historia del país. Desde el primer vuelo regular, en 1927; el primero que cruzó el Atlántico, en 1946; la llegada del Guernica a España, o de los campeones del Mundo regresando de Sudáfrica, son muchas las historias y personajes reflejados en las paredes y pantallas del Conde Duque.





Vídeos divulgativos para todos los públicos



Un elemento importante de la exposición son breves videos divulgativos que, bajo el título genérico “Sabías que”, explican al público por qué vuela un avión, las diferencias entre los primeros aparatos y los actuales, qué en un slot, qué luces llevan los aviones o el alfabeto radiofónico, entre otras muchas curiosidades de la aviación.



Otros vídeos muestran la historia de la publicidad y los carteles, los objetos que han acompañado los viajes, personajes famosos que han viajado con Iberia o la historia de los uniformes y de los aviones.



Para participar



Para finalizar, se ofrece a los visitantes la posibilidad de demostrar lo que han aprendido en la exposición, de forma divertida y en competencia entre ellos.



Cierra el recorrido una reproducción de la cabina del primer avión donde los visitantes pueden retroceder en el tiempo y hacerse fotos sentados en los asientos de mimbre de la época.





Viaje en el tiempo y 90 horas a precios locos, otras maneras de celebrar los 90 años



Pero esto no esto todo. Iberia está llevando a cabo otras acciones para celebrar su aniversario con sus clientes y con todos aquellos que se sienten próximos a la aerolínea.



Hoy mismo, Iberia lanza una promoción de 90 horas a precios locos, una fórmula inédita hasta ahora. Desde ya, en www.iberia.com, los buscadores de gangas tendrán 90 horas para encontrar la suya.





Asimismo, hoy también se estrena la nueva serie de ficción de Podium Podcast dedicada a los viajes en el tiempo. Desde 2150, los pasajeros de la Aerolínea Momentos, pueden viajar a los siglos XX y XXI y revivir situaciones reales desde la perspectiva de quienes viven casi dos siglos después. Una aventura y una manera de ver el futuro y el pasado que no se lo pueden perder.





Sobre Iberia: Iberia es la primera compañía de España y líder en las rutas entre Europa y Latinoamérica. Junto con su filial Iberia Express y su franquiciada Iberia Regional Air Nostrum, ofrece alrededor de 600 vuelos al día a medio centenar de países de Europa, América, África, Oriente Medio y Asia, con una flota de 135 aviones. En 2017 Iberia ha conseguido su 4ª estrella Skytrax y, en 2016, fue la aerolínea más puntual del mundo, según FlightStats. Iberia tiene su hub en el aeropuerto de Madrid, y es miembro de la alianza oneworld, que ofrece más de 14.000 vuelos diarios a cerca de 1.000 aeropuertos en más de 150 países.

Read more...

Embraer Announces Delivery of the First E190-E2 in April of 2018

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/embraer-announces-delivery-of-the-first-e190-e2-in-april-of-2018-300538751.html

Read more...

Drone Aviation awarded contract for Enhanced WASP Tactical Aerostat from US Defense Dept

http://www.spacewar.com/reports/Drone_Aviation_Awarded_Contract_for_Enhanced_WASP_Tactical_Aerostat_from_U_S__Department_of_Defense_999.html

Read more...

SpaceX to Launch Mysterious Payload for Northrop Grumman

http://www.satellitetoday.com/launch/2017/10/18/spacex-launch-mysterious-payload-northrop-grumman/

Read more...

This is what Sikorsky thinks should replace the Blackhawk

http://www.wearethemighty.com/gear-tech/this-is-what-sikorsky-thinks-should-replace-the-blackhawk

Read more...

US Army investigates unmanned medevac and medical resupply

https://www.airmedandrescue.com/story/2510

Read more...

Pacific Drone Challenge™: 4500 Miles Across the Pacific – Non-Stop and Unmanned

https://www.suasnews.com/2017/10/pacific-drone-challenge-4500-miles-across-pacific-non-stop-unmanned/

Read more...

Rolls-Royce Readies For Advance3 Core Test

First all-new big core configuration in 50 years paves way for next-gen Advance and UltraFan

Just over 3.5 years after unveiling its future large civil engine development road map, Rolls-Royce is poised to run the first demonstrator core at the heart of the strategy. The core is the common element of the company’s plan to make a step change in efficiency with two engine families for the 2020s. The first of these, the Advance, is a direct-drive turbofan with an overall pressure ratio of more than 60:1 and fuel-burn level at least 20% better than the current Trent 700. The ... http://aviationweek.com/aviation-week-space-technology/rolls-royce-readies-advance3-core-test

Read more...

Iberia estrena en 2018 vuelos a San Francisco y Managua



  • Además, a partir de octubre de 2018, Iberia planea aumentar de tres a cinco vuelos semanales su oferta con Tokio, sujeto a aprobación gubernamental.
  • Iberia mejora el servicio en la ruta a Tel Aviv al programar los aviones A330-200 de largo radio.


Las iniciativas que está implantando Iberia para ser más competitiva, dentro de su Plan de Futuro, siguen dando sus frutos y permitiendo a la compañía abrir nuevas rutas y reforzar su red. El proceso de reducción de costes, mejora de productividad, la nueva flota, el nuevo producto de largo radio, y las nuevas políticas comerciales, entre otras iniciativas, que Iberia tiene que seguir aplicando, están haciendo que mercados donde Iberia no podía competir supongan ahora una oportunidad para la compañía.



Así, en la próxima temporada de verano 2018, Iberia ofrecerá vuelos directos a San Francisco, destino donde nunca antes ha volado Iberia, con tres frecuencias semanales directas de abril a septiembre, ambos meses incluidos.



También estrenará vuelos a Managua, a partir de primeros de octubre, con otras tres frecuencias semanales, directas a la vuelta y con escala en Guatemala a la ida. Esta nueva ruta permite ofrecer un vuelo diario a Guatemala.



Estos vuelos ya están disponibles para su venta en www.iberia.com y agencias de viaje.


Tokio, 5 vuelos semanales, y Tel Aviv en A330-200



Iberia celebró ayer el primer aniversario de los vuelos directos a Tokio. Esta ruta, que arrancó con tres vuelos semanales, pasará a tener cinco vuelos a partir del 20 de octubre de 2018, sujeto a aprobación gubernamental, mejorando la oferta a sus clientes.



Por otro lado, Iberia va a mejor el producto en su ruta a Tel Aviv, al programar los aviones de largo radio A330-200. A partir de abril de 2018 ofrecerá un vuelo diario con dicha flota que cuenta con asientos más cómodos, que en Business se convierten en camas de dos metros, entretenimiento individual a la carta y wifi para todos los clientes, entre otras mejoras.



Luis Gallego, presidente de Iberia, ha afirmado: “El Plan de Futuro y el compromiso de todos es lo que nos está permitiendo avanzar paso a paso. La posibilidad de mantener estas rutas en el futuro y de entrar en nuevos mercados va a depender de nuestra capacidad de seguir ganando competitividad y mejorando el servicio a nuestros clientes”.


Horario vuelos con San Francisco

Vuelo
Días
De
A
Salida
Llegada
Fechas
IB6175
Lunes, miércoles, viernes
MAD
SFO
12:25
16:00
De 25 abril a 28 sept, 2018
IB6174
SFO
MAD
18:00
14:15



Horario vuelos a Managua

Vuelo
Días
De
A
Salida
Llegada
Fechas
IB6343
Lunes, miércoles y viernes
MAD
GUA
12:25
15:40
Desde el 1 de octubre
IB6344
GUA
MGA
17:10
18:30
IB6344
MGA
MAD
19:45
14:15+1



 



Sobre Iberia: Iberia es la primera compañía de España y líder en las rutas entre Europa y Latinoamérica. Junto con su filial Iberia Express y su franquiciada Iberia Regional Air Nostrum, ofrece alrededor de 600 vuelos al día a medio centenar de países de Europa, América, África, Oriente Medio y Asia, con una flota de 135 aviones. En 2017 Iberia ha conseguido su 4ª estrella Skytrax y, en 2016, fue la aerolínea más puntual del mundo, según FlightStats. Iberia tiene su hub en el aeropuerto de Madrid, y es miembro de la alianza oneworld, que ofrece más de 14.000 vuelos diarios a cerca de 1.000 aeropuertos en más de 150 países.

Read more...

US approves $2.404bn sale of F-16 Fighting Falcon upgrade to Greece

http://www.airforce-technology.com/news/newsus-approves-2404bn-sale-of-f-16-fighting-falcon-upgrade-to-greece-5952157

Read more...

Light-bending algae boost organic solar cell efficiency

https://newatlas.com/diatoms-algae-organic-solar-cells/51806/

Read more...